Welcome to Kernersville Eye Surgeons! We are a comprehensive ophthalmology practice in the center of North Carolina’s Piedmont Triad. We specialize in medical, laser, and surgical treatment of eye disease including cataracts, glaucoma, eyelid conditions, dry eye, diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, retinal detachment, eye injuries and many others. We also see patients age 6 and older for routine eye care.

Kernersville Eye Surgeons is a patient-focused ophthalmology practice that will treat you with compassion and as an individual–not a number. While we strive to make your visit efficient, we also spend as much time with you as needed to ensure you understand your eye problem and what we can do to help.

We use state-of-the-art equipment to accurately diagnose and properly treat your eye conditions. Doctors Hageman and Geiger are Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology and both are trained in the safest and most modern eye surgery techniques. Visit us at Kernersville Eye Surgeons and see what we can do for your sight.

Welcome to Kernersville Eye Surgeons! We are a comprehensive ophthalmology practice in the center of North Carolina’s Piedmont Triad. We specialize in medical, laser, and surgical treatment of cataracts, glaucoma, eyelid conditions, dry eyes, diabetic eye disease, and macular degeneration. We also see patients of all ages for routine eye care.

Kernersville Eye Surgeons is a patient-focused ophthalmology practice that will treat you with compassion and as an individual–not a number. While we strive to make your visit efficient, we also spend as much time with you as needed to ensure you understand your eye problem and what we can do to help.

We use state-of-the-art equipment to accurately diagnose and properly treat your eye conditions. Doctor Hageman and Doctor Geiger are Board Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology and both are trained in the safest and most modern eye surgery techniques. Visit us at Kernersville Eye Surgeons and see what we can do for your sight.

Please visit www.GetEyeSmart.org for additional educational material

Cataract Center
A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s naturally clear lens. Your eye becomes like a window that is frosted or yellowed. Cataracts are a common cause of vision loss, especially as we age, but they are treatable. The only definitive treatment of cataracts is surgery to remove the eye’s cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial clear lens. This surgery can only be done by an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). There are many artificial lens options for people undergoing cataract surgery, some of which provide the chance for significantly less dependence on glasses after cataract surgery. Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about cataracts, its treatment, and lens options.
Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a disease in which the optic nerve is damaged, leading to progressive, irreversible loss of vision. It is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma is often, but not always, associated with increased pressure inside the eye. There are many different types of glaucoma, but they all result in permanent damage to the the optic nerve, which is the part of the eye that carries the images we see to the brain. Glaucoma is often called “the silent thief of sight” because people with the disease often have no symptoms until severe vision loss has occurred. If detected early and treated with eye drops, laser or surgery, severe vision loss can be prevented. Anyone with a family history of glaucoma should have a complete eye exam by an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about glaucoma and its treatments.
Retina
The retina is a thin layer of tissue that lines the inside wall of the eye like wallpaper. This is the light sensitive tissue in the eye similar to film in a camera. The front parts of the eye, the cornea and lens, focus light on the retina which then transmits an electrical signal to the visual centers in your brain to produce an image. There are many conditions that affect the retina that lead to vision loss such as detachments, holes or degenerations of the retina. Many common diseases can affect the function of the retina as well such as diabetes and hypertension. Please see our patient education section for more information.

Cataract Center

A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s naturally clear lens. Your eye becomes like a window that is frosted or yellowed. Cataracts are a common cause of vision loss, especially as we age, but they are treatable. The only definitive treatment of cataracts is surgery to remove the eye’s cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial clear lens. This surgery can only be done by an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). There are many artificial lens options for people undergoing cataract surgery, some of which provide the chance for significantly less dependence on glasses after cataract surgery. Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about cataracts, its treatment, and lens options.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a disease in which the optic nerve is damaged, leading to progressive, irreversible loss of vision. It is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma is often, but not always, associated with increased pressure inside the eye. There are many different types of glaucoma, but they all result in permanent damage to the the optic nerve, which is the part of the eye that carries the images we see to the brain. Glaucoma is often called “the silent thief of sight” because people with the disease often have no symptoms until severe vision loss has occurred. If detected early and treated with eye drops, laser or surgery, severe vision loss can be prevented. Anyone with a family history of glaucoma should have a complete eye exam by an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about glaucoma and its treatments.

Dry Eye Center
Typical symptoms for people suffering from dry eyes are burning, irritation, blurred vision, and (ironically) tearing. Dry eyes can be caused by decreased tear production or increased tear evaporation, or a combination of both. Some diseases and some medications may also contribute to dry eyes. Fortunately, there are a number of treatments to help with dry eyes. Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about dry eyes and its treatments.
Diabetes Center
Diabetes is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States. High levels of sugar in the blood cause damage to the blood vessels in the retina, the nerve layer that covers the back of the eye. These damaged blood vessels can leak and cause vision loss, sometimes sudden and severe. At its worst, diabetic eye disease can result in new, abnormal blood vessel growth, severe glaucoma, retinal detachment and total blindness. It is extremely important for all diabetics to have at least yearly eye exams by an ophthalmologist. Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about diabetic eye disease and its treatments.
Macular Degeneration
The macula is the most sensitive part of the retina, or nerve layer covering the back of the eye. It serves our central vision and allows us to read, distinguish faces, and see fine detail. Macular degeneration occurs in “dry” and “wet” forms. In the dry form, debris called drusen accumulate and parts of the macula die earlier than normal, causing slowly progressive central vision loss. In the wet form, which is generally more severe, fragile blood vessels that can bleed suddenly grow in the macula and can cause severe, central vision loss without warning. Please visit our Patient Education section to learn more about macular degeneration and its treatments.
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